Reflecting on Changes in US Education since 1954

If school desegregation policies are on your mind, you might be interested in the book All Deliberate Speed by Charles Ogletree, or the Freely-Available Article This Week, described in the following quote from Teachers College Record newsletter:

Black, White, and Brown: The Transformation of Public Education in America
by Charles Vert Willie & Sarah Susannah Willie
This article reflects upon changes in U.S. education since the U.S. Supreme Court’s 1954 decision in Brown v. the Board of Education of Topeka, Kansas. The authors reject both the naively hopeful and the bitterly cynical interpretations of the efficacy of Brown in favor of a more moderate assessment: Brown has had many positive effects, they argue, but it has been slow going and there is much work yet to be done. Drawing on their research in primary, secondary, and post-secondary educational settings, the authors argue that the concept of justice is a negotiated concept that depends on the “representative viewpoints”; they examine the obstacles that have impeded the full implementation of Brown; they note a few school systems that have achieved more just and equitable school systems; they consult census data that reveal increasing equity between Blacks and Whites when it comes to educational achievement; and finally, they examine the legacy of the Brown decision for other gro ups of children. Referring to Brown as a “work in progress,” the authors argue that group-specific remedies are not only legally defensible, but also crucial in achieving greater educational equity and student diversity.

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